• MCM

1 hour

All audiences

Faecal calprotectin for screening of patients with suspected inflammatory bowel disease: diagnostic meta-analysis

Learning outcomes

1) Recognise that a raised faecal calprotectin concentration may identify those patients who are most likely to have inflammatory bowel disease

2) Recognise that the diagnostic accuracy of faecal calprotectin depends on the prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease in the target population.

Written by:

BMJ and the Cleveland Clinic

BMJ and the Cleveland Clinic

Authors/Faculty:

Patrick F van Rheenen, Els Van de Vijver, and Vaclav Fidler

Patrick F van Rheenen, Els Van de Vijver, and Vaclav Fidler

Biography :

Patrick van Rheenen is a paediatric gastroenterologist at Beatrix Children’s Hospital, University Medical Centre Groningen, Netherlands. Els Van de Vijver is a paediatric gastroenterologist at Beatrix Children’s Hospital, University Medical Centre Groningen, Netherlands. Vaclav Fidler is a statistician in the Department of Epidemiology, University Medical Centre Groningen, Netherlands.

Disclosure :

All authors have completed the Unified Competing Interest form at www.icmje.org/coi_disclosure.pdf (available on request from the corresponding author) and declare: no support from any institution for the submitted work; no financial relationships with any institutions that might have an interest in the submitted work in the previous three years; no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

Activity Directors:

William D Carey, MD and Dr Kirsten Patrick

William D Carey, MD and Dr Kirsten Patrick

Biography :

William D Carey, MD is Director, Center for Continuing Education, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. Dr Kirsten Patrick is an Assistant Editor, British Medical Journal, London.

Disclosure :

We declare no financial interests, commercial affiliations, or conflicts of interest.

CME Disclaimer :

The information in this educational activity is provided for general medical education purposes only and is not meant to substitute for the independent medical judgment of a physician relative to diagnostic and treatment options of a specific patient's medical condition. The viewpoints expressed in this CME activity are those of the authors/faculty. They do not represent an endorsement by any of the accreditors. In no event will any of the accreditors be liable for any decision made or action taken in reliance upon the information provided through this CME activity.

Accreditation

Accreditor credit Accreditation statement
ASCOFAME 1:00 hour BMJ Learning has assigned 1 hour of CPD/CME credit to this module. BMJ Learning modules are being certified for ASCOFAME VIRTUAL (Colombia).
Australian Practice Nurses Association 1 credit, 1:00 hour BMJ Learning has achieved the status of an APNA Endorsed Education Provider
Austrian Academy of Physicians 1 credit, 1:00 hour BMJ Learning modules have been certified for DFT Punkte. DFT Punkte are accepted in Austria
BMJ Learning 1 credit, 1:00 hour BMJ Learning has assigned one hour of CPD/CME credit to the module and related journal article
Bahrain Defence Force Hospital 1 credit, 1:00 hour The Bahrain Defence Force Military Hospital represented by the Ministry of Defence Bahrain recognises BMJ Learning as being accredited for the purpose of continuous medical education (CME)/continuous professional development (CPD) in BDF. Healthcare professionals can thus claim continuous professional development credits for their activity in BMJ Learning. Completion of one module is considered the equivalent of one credit or one hour of learning.
Delhi Medical Council 1 credit, 1:00 hour The Delhi Medical Council recognises BMJ Learning as being accredited for the purpose of continuous medical education (CME)/continuous professional development (CPD). Doctors can thus claim continuous professional development credits for their activity in BMJ Learning. Completion of one module is considered the equivalent of 1 credit or 1 hour of learning.
Dubai Health Authority 1 credit, 1:00 hour BMJ Learning is approved as a CME resource by the Dubai Health Authority (accreditation number 0254/11)
Iraqi Ministry of Health 1 credit, 1:00 hour The Iraq Ministry of Health has accredited BMJ Learning for the purposes of CME. One module is the equivalent of one hour or one credit point.
Kuwait Institute for Medical Specialization 1 credit, 1:00 hour Kuwait Institute for Medical Specialization (KIMS) of the Ministry of Health, State of Kuwait is the authority responsible for organising all aspects of postgraduate training of medical practitioners and other health professionals in Kuwait. Users within Kuwait can claim one hour or one credit per hour of learning completed.
Royal Australasian College of Physicians 1:00 hour The RACP does not accredit CPD activities, but MyCPD Program guidelines state that fellows can claim a maximum of 50 credits per year for online learning under 'Category 6 - Other Learning Activities'.
The Colleges of Medicine of South Africa 3 credits The Colleges of Medicine of South Africa has accredited this BMJ Learning module (accreditation number: MDB014/254/06/2010)
The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners 1 credit, 1:00 hour RNZCGP endorses the British Medical Journal online CME programmes
The Supreme Council of Health in Qatar 1 credit, 1:00 hour The Supreme Council of Health represented by the Accreditation Department of the Qatar Council for Health Practitioners recognizes BMJ Learning as being accredited for the purposes of continuous medical education (CME)/continuing professional development (CPD) in the State of Qatar. Healthcare professionals in Qatar can thus claim continuing professional development credits for their activity on BMJ Learning. Completion of one learning module is considered to be the equivalent of 1 credit or 1 hour of learning.

Release date

15 Jul 2010

Expiration date

15 Jul 2012